23cm band report ITU‑R M.2532 published

23cm band report ITU‑R M.2532 published

https://www.iaru-r1.org/wp-content/uploads/2023/11/R-REP-M.2532-2023-PDF-E.pdf

The information paper ZL23_C5_19 1.3 GHz Band – Additional Information was submitted by the RSGB to the IARU Region 1 Conference held Novemebr 1-4, 2023. It provides information on the situation in the 1240-1300 MHz and 13001350 MHz spectrum. It can be downloaded from ZL23_C5_19 1300MHz INFO

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Delfi-C3 – DO64 Deorbiting Soon

Delfi-C3 – DO64 Deorbiting Soon

After more than 15 years in orbit, Delfi-C3’s mission is about to come to an end. The team predict that re-entry will take place around November 16th 2023.

The re-entry date might vary depending on the solar activity, which is very hard to predict accurately. See also @Marco_Langbroek on Twitter for a similar prediction.

https://twitter.com/Marco_Langbroek/status/1720110996499349663

We would like to request all amateur radio operators / SWL’s / satellite enthusiasts worldwide to listen for Delfi-C3’s telemetry downlink on 145.867 MHz, 1200 baud AX.25 BPSK. We will hand out an award certificate to the person submitting the last Delfi-C3 telemetry frame.

This can be done either through the RASCAL software (updated version coming…), through the SATNOGS network or by sending us decoded telemetry frames with reception time and location via email to Delfi_at_tudelft.nl.

On behalf of the entire Delfi-C3 team, we would like to sincerely thank the worldwide amateur radio / SWL / satellite community for assisting the team by forwarding received telemetry and reception reports.

Back in 2008 we could not imagine the great support received so far and the many first we had, including a successful ground network and flying the first linear transponder in a CubeSat.

We strongly believe that Delfi-C3 has paved the way for many follow-on missions (both amateur and commercial), and has been a great step towards maturing CubeSat technology as well as training the next generation of space engineers. Stay tuned for updates!

On behalf of the team best 73s,

Wouter PA3WEG

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ISS SSTV Verification Test – Oct 27-Nov 1

ISS SSTV Verification Test – Oct 27-Nov 1

The SSTV system in the Service Module will be activated to attempt to verify a replacement piece of hardware during the period of Oct 27 until Nov 01.

The system will be off around the required period of no transmissions during the planned EVA on Oct 31. Images will be transmitted on 145.800 MHz and in the typical PD120 format.

There are 2 windows for testing, separated by an EVA:
Fri Oct 27 at 12:15 GMT – Sun Oct 29 at 18:50 GMT
Tue Oct 31 at 10:05 GMT – Wed Nov 01 at 18:10 GMT

Your images can be posted to the Gallery at https://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php

Since this is a test of replacement components of the system, there still may be unexpected outages or issues.

The signal should be receivable on a handheld with a 1/4 wave whip. If your rig has selectable FM filters try the wider filter for 25 kHz channel spacing.

You can get predictions for the ISS pass times at https://www.amsat.org/track/

ARISS SSTV Blog https://ariss-sstv.blogspot.com/

Useful SSTV info and links https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/iss-sstv/

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Kent school students to contact ISS astronaut

Kent school students to contact ISS astronaut

https://live.ariss.org

As time allows, students will ask these questions:
1. Is it hot or cold in space, and if it’s hot how do you keep cool and if it’s cold how do you keep warm in your spacesuit?
2. Is it really true that girls are better suited to space than boys?
3. How do you tell if it’s night or day on the international space station?
4. Would you be happy to live in space for the rest of your life if you were told to?
5. What are your thoughts about space travel in the future for mankind?
6. In the future will we be able to take holidays to the international space station?
7. Do you think living organisms will ever be found in space, and if so what could they be?
8. Do you get dizzy in space when you are not moving? Or does the lack of gravity mean that you do not get dizzy?
9. Does the ISS shake when a Soyuz spacecraft docks?
10. I know we can measure gravity, but what is gravity?
11. What is the furthest distance a human has travelled away from Planet Earth?
12. What would happen if you played on a swing in space?
13. What is the most amazing thing you have seen on earth from the space station?
14. How do fires behave in space?
15. Have you seen any comets?
16. How much work do you have to do on the space station each day, and what do you do in your spare time?
17. My brother and I love space, my brother especially loves the moon. We would love to be able to explore space one day. What advice can you give us, to help our dreams come true?
18. What did you study in school to become an astronaut?
19. How does the space station renew the oxygen inside the station?
20. What is different about growing plants in space and do you think we’ll be able to grow food for long term space missions?
21. Will there be a point soon when you can watch Netflix or use your mobile phone in Space – as you are near the satellites that operate the signals?
About ARISS:
Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station (ISS). In the United States, sponsors are the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), Amateur Radio Digital Communications (ARDC), Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT), NASA’s Space Communications and Navigation program (SCaN) and the ISS National Lab—Space Station Explorers. The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, the arts, and mathematics topics. ARISS does this by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students. Before and during these radio contacts, students, educators, parents, and communities take part in hands-on learning activities tied to space, space technologies, and amateur radio.
For more information, see http://www.ariss.org

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1240-1300 MHz – ITU-R WP5A fails to achieve consensus

1240-1300 MHz – ITU-R WP5A fails to achieve consensus

https://www.iaru.org/wp-content/uploads/2023/10/Report-from-WP5A_Sept-2023.pdf

The ITU-R WP5A Meeting Report can be downloaded from
https://itu.int/md/R19-WP5A/new/en
Word Doc https://www.itu.int/dms_pub/itu-r/md/19/wp5a/c/R19-WP5A-C-0837!!MSW-E.docx

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