Tevel satellites on SpaceX launch

Tevel satellites on SpaceX launch

The Tevel mission consisting of 8 satellites developed by the Herzliya Science Center in Israel, each carrying an FM transponder, is expected to launch on January 13 at 15:25 GMT on the SpaceX Falcon-9 Transporter-3 mission. This mission also carries AMSAT-EA’s EASAT-2 and HADES satellites.

The AMSAT News Service reports:

Tevel-1, Tevel-2 ….Tevel-8

Beacon transmissions on 436.400 MHz, (9600bps BPSK G3RUH)
FM transponders uplink frequency: 145.970 MHz|
FM transponders downlink frequency: 436.400 MHz

All 8 satellites will have the same frequencies, so as long as the footprints are overlapping, only one FM transponder will be activated. The satellites were built by 8 schools in different parts of Israel.

Prelaunch TLEs:

Deployment number 28

TEVEL-4/TEVEL-5
1 12345U 22-T3TE 22013.69008102 0.00000000 00000-0 00000-0 0 9997
2 12345 97.3652 83.6317 0010843 246.0911 147.6817 15.12493461 06

Deployment number 30

TEVEL-1/TEVEL-2/TEVEL-3
1 12345U 22-T3TE 22013.69038194 0.00000000 00000-0 00000-0 0 9991
2 12345 97.3658 83.6317 0009074 254.1211 141.2940 15.11975594 07

Deployment number 55

TEVEL-6/TEVEL-7/TEVEL-8
1 12345U 22-T3TE 22013.69375000 0.00000000 00000-0 00000-0 0 9991
2 12345 97.3676 83.6318 0009046 252.0606 161.7026 15.11914367 05

Control station will be 4X4HSC at the Herzliya Science Center.

[ANS thanks David Greenberg, 4X1DG, for the above information]

IARU Satellite Frequency Coordination information
http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=744

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m5aka

AMSAT-UK

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Launch of EASAT-2 and HADES satellites

Launch of EASAT-2 and HADES satellites

http://www.aprs.org/psat2.html).

The camera chip is the Omnivision OV2640, which provides a resolution of up to 2M pixels and compressed output in JPEG. Resolution is limited by the CPU’s internal memory (MCU) that controls the camera to 320×240 (typical) or 640×480 maximum. The MCU selected for the control is the STM32F446RET6, which has the smallest possible footprint with connection to DCMI peripheral, necessary for connection with the camera.

Images can be stored on a 2 MB serial flash memory. The complete SSTV encoder has managed to be implemented in a 4-layer PCB with dimensions of only 38x38mm.

The MCU can be fully controlled from ground stations. The firmware allows the sending of images of the camera live,of imágenes previously saved in the flash memory or of images encoded in ROM. It also provides advance programming of image acquisition and PSK telemetry with the current status (event counters, temperature, voltage, light conditions, etc.) and a brief summary.

The described module has been developed and manufactured at the Department of Radioelectronics of the Brno University of Technology in the Czech Republic. Both hardware and firmware designs with the source codes will be available on Github under the MIT license (https://github.com/alpov/SatCam).

Initially only the EASAT-2 repeater is active. Hades’ will be activated by telecommand a few days after launch.

The frequencies coordinated with IARU for both satellites are as follows:

EASAT-2
  • 145.875 MHz uplink, Modes: VOICE FM (without undertone) and FSK 50 bps, AFSK, AX.25, APRS 1200 / 2400 bps
  • 436.666 MHz downlink, Modes: FM voice, CW, FSK 50 bps, FM voice beacon with AM5SAT callsign

HADES

  • 145.925 MHz uplink, Modes: VOICE FM (without undertone) and FSK 50 bps, AFSK, AX.25, APRS 1200 / 2400 bps
  • 436.888 MHz downlink, Modes: FM voice, CW FSK 50 bps, SSTV Robot 36, FM voice beacon with AM6SAT callsign

The description of the transmissions can be found in the following document:

EspañolEnglish:

AMSAT-EA appreciates the reception of telemetry, voice beacons and SSTV images. A paper QSL is sent to those who send their transmissions. It can be done through the following link: http://data.amsat-ea.org

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m5aka

AMSAT-UK

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First ever Svalbard QO-100 DXpedition JW100QO

First ever Svalbard QO-100 DXpedition JW100QO

A DXpedition to Svalbard (78° North) is planned for April 19-26 with the callsign JW0X. In addition to the five HF stations (FT8/FT4/RTTY/SSB/CW) the team will activate the first QO-100 satellite DX Station callsign JW100QO April 22-24.

Making the first ever QO-100 calls from Svalbard is the biggest challenge of this DXpedition. ON4CKM Cedric, ON4DCU Patrick and ON5UR Max will make a rugged snowmobile ride of almost 100 km in temperatures of -20° – 25° Celsius to reach their goal. Kapp Linné is the only place in the area that allows a view of the QO-100 satellite at only 3° above the horizon. Svalbard also lies on the edge of the satellite area (footprint), which makes the challenge even greater. We want to give as many radio amateurs as possible the opportunity to work this first QO-100 DXpedition. For this unique challenge we also have a special callsign JW100QO.

Further info at:

Svalbard QO-100 JW100QO April 22-24
https://www.dx-adventure.com/en/qo-100-our-goal/

Svalbard JW0X April 19-26
https://www.dx-adventure.com/en/svalbard-dx-pedition/

QO-100 geostationary amateur satellite transponder provides coverage from Brazil to Thailand, see
https://amsat-uk.org/satellites/geo/eshail-2/

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m5aka

AMSAT-UK

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FUNcube – Welcome to 2022

FUNcube – Welcome to 2022

There are presently three FUNcube based missions in orbit – currently all of them have active, linear U/V transponders. The current status of each of these can always be checked on the useful AMSAT-NA status page https://www.amsat.org/status/ and an update on each of them is provided below. Please have FUN using them!

AO73 – FUNcube1. As previously reported AO73 appears to be experiencing some power issues after 8+years in orbit.

The battery is not charging to the same voltage as it did up to early November last year. The spacecraft has experienced many months of continuous sunlight over the past couple of years and this has resulted in high (around +30C) onboard temperatures. This environment may have “cooked” the cells although presently we do not see any direct evidence of this.

We can see that the stable bus voltage indicated at the end of charge is now much lower and depends on the current being taken by the on-board systems. The solar panel currents appear to be similar to those recorded soon after launch. The current best theory is that we are seeing the effect of some increased resistance in the supply circuit between the eps charging circuit and the battery. Although we do not have access to a fully detailed circuit diagram of the EPS we believe that there is an “ideal diode” in this line to prevent discharge of the battery back through the EPS circuitry. We understand that this is actually a MOSFET device and the suspicion is that this may now be showing signs of radiation damage.

So an operational mode has been selected that can be hopefully sustained for some time. From today AO73 is in continuous transponder mode and is available for use 24/7. Low power telemetry is also being transmitted and reports of the data are very welcome via the FUNcube Data Warehouse. Please remember that the uplink frequency varies with on board temperatures. A lower temperature means a higher frequency!

EO88 – Nayif-1. EO88 continues to perform nominally and is switching between high power telemetry for educational outreach when in sunlight and to its U/V transponder mode when in eclipse. It will soon celebrate its 5th birthday in space after launch on 15th February 2017.

JO97 – JY1Sat. JO97 suddenly stopped transmitting telemetry data on May 1st last year. The cause of this anomaly is unknown but fortunately the U/V transponder continues to operate continuously.

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m5aka

AMSAT-UK

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XW-3 (CAS-9) Satellite Launch December 26

XW-3 (CAS-9) Satellite Launch December 26

The CAMSAT XW-3 (CAS-9) satellite carrying a 145/435 linear transponder has been installed on the CZ-4C Y39 launch vehicle at the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center. The launch is scheduled for 03:11:31 GMT on December 26.

XW-3(CAS-9) satellite will be piggybacked on the rocket with primary payload ZY-1(02E) satellite. The satellite orbit is a circular sun-synchronous orbit with an altitude of 770.1 kilometers and an inclination of 98.58 degrees, the running cycle is 100.14 minutes.

The functions of XW-3(CAS-9) satellite include UHF CW telemetry beacon, GMSK telemetry data transmission, V/U mode linear transponder, a visible light band space camera and an experimental thermoelectric generator for high school students.

Deployment from the launcher will take place at  at 98.858° east longitude and 28.413° north latitude at 03:35:58 GMT, location close to Western Australia. Radio amateurs should receive CW beacon and GMSK telemetry signals approximately 38 seconds after the satellite is separated from the launch vehicle, and then the linear transponder will be put into use after approximately 49 seconds.

Download the XW-3(CAS-9) Amateur Radio Satellite User’s Manual V1.0

Download the XW-3 (CAS-9) Amateur Radio Satellite Launch Time Sequence

Download the XW-3 (CAS-9) Two-Line Orbital Element file

Get The Details…

m5aka

AMSAT-UK

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