Jupiter’s Great Red Spot

Jupiter’s Great Red Spot

This image of Jupiter’s iconic Great Red Spot and surrounding turbulent zones was captured by NASA’s Juno spacecraft. The color-enhanced image is a combination of three separate images taken on April 1, 2018, as Juno performed its 12th close flyby of Jupiter. At the time the images were taken, the spacecraft was 15,379 miles (24,749 kilometers) to 30,633 miles (49,299 kilometers) from the tops of the clouds of the planet.

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A Moonlit Trio

A Moonlit Trio

The Moon, left, Jupiter, right, and Saturn, above and to the left of Jupiter, are seen after sunset with the Washington Monument, Thurs. Dec. 17, 2020, in Washington. The two planets drew closer to each other in the sky as they headed towards a “great conjunction” on Dec. 21, where the two giant planets appeared a tenth of a degree apart.

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Exobiology Deputy Branch Chief Melissa Kirven-Brooks

Exobiology Deputy Branch Chief Melissa Kirven-Brooks

“… I’ve just seen such tremendous things happen since I’ve been part of the Astrobiology Program, and that’s why I’m pretty confident we’re going to find life elsewhere, because there are just so many brilliant people working on this.” — Melissa Kirven-Brooks, Exobiology Deputy Branch Chief and Future Workforce Lead of the NASA Astrobiology Program, NASA’s Ames Research Center

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International Space Station Program Deputy Chief Scientist Meghan Everett

International Space Station Program Deputy Chief Scientist Meghan Everett

“One of my cornerstone pinnacles [is], ‘Show up to work [and] life with integrity and intent.’ So, accomplish your goals with integrity, intent, and a mission. Stick to that and have the confidence to do that, and be OK with messing up and failing, and have fun with those things.» — Meghan Everett, International Space Station Program Deputy Chief Scientist, NASA’s Johnson Space Center

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Sending “Water” to Europa

Sending “Water” to Europa

NASA’s Europa Clipper spacecraft will carry a special message when it launches in October 2024 and heads toward Jupiter’s moon Europa. The moon shows strong evidence of an ocean under its icy crust, with more than twice the amount of water of all of Earth’s oceans combined. A triangular metal plate, seen here, will honor that connection to Earth.

The plate is made of tantalum metal and is about 7 by 11 inches (18 by 28 centimeters). It is engraved on both sides and seals an opening in the electronics vault, which houses the spacecraft’s sensitive electronics. The art on this side of the plate features waveforms that are visual representations of the sound waves formed by the word «water» in 103 languages. The waveforms radiate out from a symbol representing the American Sign Language sign for «water.»

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